• Thursday , 29 June 2017

Post Industrial

Drawings by Jack Worrall which analyse the relationship between the piers Alexander Nimmo designed and the surrounding infrastructure and towns.

Drawings by Jack Worrall which analyse the relationship between the piers Alexander Nimmo designed and the surrounding infrastructure and towns.

Post Industrial is a publication designed and written by five fourth year DIT Architecture students who have researched Irish villages that were founded or grew due to industrial influences. This newspaper publication follows on from last years successful UTOPIA 7.

The students launched a fundit campaign last Friday and, if you’re interested in the subject, a €5 pledge would be very welcome. For this you’ll get a copy of the newspaper and hopefully we’ll see you at the DIT End of Year Show on June 3rd. More information on each student’s research can be seen on the Facebook page they set up facebook.com/PostIndustrialpublication/ and you can read the digital edition of last year’s newspaper UTOPIA 7

To contribute to this Fundit campaign and receive a copy of the newspaper plus other rewards, please click here.

Stephen O’Brien is studying the villages Monivea, Co. Galway and New Birmingham, Co. Tipperary. These are examples of ‘failed utopias’ of the Irish industrial village. Sir Vere Hunt Bart founded New Birmingham near the coal veins in the Slieveardagh Hills to effectively create a new trading hub between Cork and Dublin. Having had great expectations for the village, he was unable to prevent the village’s decline in 1818 and the coal industry nearby was abandoned. Robert French inherited the family estate around Monivea Castle and the village of Monivea itself in1744. He set about improving these lands and providing a better life for the local community. However, through poor management of the village after his death in 1779, his improvements were largely undone.

Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny, is a linear town planned around a crossroads. Mark Corcoran has been exploring the intrinsic influence on the town, the industrial mining which took place here for around 300 years, and also the contribution of the resident landlord family, the Wandesfordes.

Jack Worrall  is researching the work of Alexander Nimmo, a Scottish engineer who designed and built infrastructure all around Ireland. He designed roads, piers, quays, bridges, railway lines and canals. Knightstown on Valentia Island, is a village that Alexander Nimmo is said to have designed. The main street has a clear relationship with roads on the mainland, which would make one presume a bridge was planned for the future.

Mountmellick, Co. Laois was once known as the ‘Manchester of Ireland’ due to the large numbers of industries in the town. Most of the industries were established and ran by Quakers who settled in the area. This map shows Mountmellick in the year 1770; with Quaker properties outlined in red and key Quaker buildings outlined in yellow. The key buildings in this map being the meeting house and the provincial school. The research into Quakers and industry in Mountmellick was carried out by Deepka Abbi.

1770 Map by Deepka Abbi showing Quaker properties in Mountmellick 'Manchester of Ireland'

1770 Map by Deepka Abbi showing Quaker properties in Mountmellick ‘Manchester of Ireland’.

Karen Tighe is studying the occurrence of the crescent shape in Irish villages such as Stratford on Slaney. Edward Stratford established his model town of Stratford on Slaney in 1774. Stratford’s vision was to create a town solely for the manufacturing of textiles, an industrial utopia. Stratford on Slaney’s layout was inspired by the town of Bath in England which Stratford visited on several occasions.The crescent shape was an innovative urban design in the 18th century. Stratford and his wife were described as ‘the parents of the poor, and the open-hearted friends of the indigent.’

For further information you can email miriam.delaney@dit.ie.

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